Blast from the Past, Creators

In Their Words: OG Creators on their vision for Poptropica — #ThanksKinney et. al.

Hey Poptropicans, let’s throw it back a bit…

In honor of Poptropica’s birthday month and the #ThanksKinney campaign going on, we thought we’d take a look back at past posts and interviews with some OG Poptropica Creators sharing about the process behind the making of Poptropica. In some ways, this is a bit of an open letter for Jeff Kinney and the Poptropica Creators past and present.

Turns out the words of some of these original Pop Creators reveal some interesting ideas worth comparing and contrasting with how the game has been going in the past few years. We’re going be taking a look at our beloved Poptropica from the eyes of earlier masterminds Jeff Kinney, Jess Brallier, James Lema, and Mitch Krpata.

Let’s see what they had to say about how they envisioned Poptropica while they were building it in its earlier years…


Jeff Kinney: no player homes; experiencing different things

In 2014, Poptropica founder Jeff Kinney did a 10-minute interview with the media company BellyFeel, where he discusses some of the thought processes behind Poptropica. Check out the interview below, or read the transcript from BellyFeel, and excerpts below the video.

My first idea for Poptropica was that you would be a person who would live in an apartment and that you could collect things and bring them back to your apartment, and we’ve seen that model in lots of games like Animal Crossing and there are many virtual worlds that follow that model but this was right around the time that kids started to carry around iPods and there was that feeling that a kid carries their content with them. So we took that central mechanic of the game, that your character doesn’t actually have a home. Your character travels and brings everything with them.

That’s very liberating because then you don’t have a geographic challenge. If you had to keep going back to your house or apartment, you would be limited in a way as far as how far you could go. The idea now is that the character just island hops

I think that each island has its own, its own set of rules, its own universe and by not being overly thematic or by not creating one set of rules for the universe, I think it gives our kids a chance to experience all sorts of different things and that’s fun and freeing.

Some of the stories we’ve told, I can’t believe we’ve gotten away with, I think the most exotic story or esoteric story we’ve told is we have an island called Mystery Train where you’re travelling in the late 1800’s on a train from Washington DC to the Chicago Worlds Fair and you meet Nikola Tesla and Gustave Eiffel and all these luminaries from that time, and I kind of held my breath, I didn’t think kids would like it. But it’s one of our most popular islands because I think it’s authentic and rich.

Jeff Kinney

Interestingly, Poptropica did end up making player homes a feature, which another Creator we’ll mention later in this post says was the most requested feature for the game. However, with the arrival of Paradise Island, Poptropica has recently been criticized by fans for trying to be too much like Animal Crossing. Can they go back to their roots?


Jess Brallier: staying around like Disney; not just another game

In 2013, the learning company Future Think filmed a video of then-president of Poptropica, Jess Brallier, talking about his vision for the game, which resurfaced in 2019 thanks to idk and Osmium. Check it out:

When we shared the video here on the PHB last year, we highlighted the following quote right from this publisher’s mouth that still resonates today with players hoping for new islands more than anything else:

“We’re not doing a virtual world to create a social networking opportunity, not to house games, not to host a virtual economy, but to tell stories… the point of Poptropica is to tell kids stories in the literacy of their choosing.

Jess Brallier

This sentiment also echoes an interview the PHB hosted in 2015 with Mr. Brallier with questions asked by our readers. Here are a couple highlights about his dreams for Poptropica:

When asked, “Are there certain things that you think that Poptropica should achieve? What are they?” Mr. Brallier talked about expanding the franchise to different media, comparing it to the Disney empire.

Like Disney, we want to stay around for generations. We like to imagine our grandchildren smiling because of something Poptropica. We’d like to have a best-selling book series, a top ten iOS app, a record-breaking film, a wildly popular TV series, and a much-loved YouTube channel… But most of all, we hope that through our storytelling, art, animation, and programming to inspire a next generation of creators.

Jess Brallier

Since then, Poptropica has achieved that best-selling book series with the four graphic novels and briefly made it to #1 on the iOS App Store in August 2020 (while disparaging competitor Animal Jam in a victory post). Maybe more will lie ahead?

To another question, “What kind of skills do you look for when hiring Poptropica Creators?”, Mr. Brallier answered:

A love for storytelling and a desire to do what nobody else is doing. Many can illustrate or program, but do they do what they do because of a love and appreciation for storytelling. And our success is about doing what others don’t do. We’re not a book publisher, we’re not just another game, we’re not just another world with weird penguins or monsters or dolls running around in it. We seek not to copy, but to be the first to show up with something unexpected.

Jess Brallier

That sounds about right. 🙂


James Lema: we are not Facebook for kids

In 2013, Poptropica’s director of product development, James Lema (aka Director D), wrote on the blog of a kids brand agency called Dubit titled “Five things learned from five years of Poptropica,” which the PHB covered soon after. Another 5+ years later, let’s see how it stacks up…

The five points he gives focus on being different in the following ways: 1) focusing on narrative quests; 2) simplifying the start process; 3) using 2D art; 4) pre-scripted chat; and 5) not trying to be “Facebook for kids.” You can read more in the blog post he wrote here.

Here’s a closer look at point #5, last but certainly not least:

Since the magnificent rise of Facebook, there have been numerous companies that have tried to create a social offering for kids that follows the Facebook model. Poptropica actively decided to not go down that path.

As Poptropica grows, we want to engage kids in ways they have never experienced. From that, we created Poptropica Friends – a 100 percent safe, social experience that allows the user to tell the story about themselves.

Everyday, we ask the user a question (ex. What’s your favourite sport? Have you ever tried sushi? Do you like dogs or cats?). The answer is a visual tile that becomes part of their profile. The more questions the user answers, the more visual their personality becomes. It’s a rich tapestry that tells the personality of the user in a way that has never been done.

James Lema

Players certainly appreciate Poptropica’s intentionally different approach to the social experience, with many reports of features to love about the original Friends profiles (the 2019 reboot left some things to be desired). Let’s bring back pop quizzes (the question tiles mentioned earlier), adding friends by username, Multiverse, and more!


Mitch Krpata: world-building; not a superficial experience

Okay, last one! It’s been a long post, but thanks for sticking with it this far. This last one is plentiful, but offers a lot of insight into the inner workings of Poptropica. Here’s Mitch Krpata (aka Captain Crawfish)!

In 2017, this Poptropica senior story developer did two significant interviews about his work: one directly with the PHB about his job and more, and another with a podcast called The Oddball Show. Among the many insights from the latter, here are a few excerpts worth highlighting about the design of the game experience:

Poptropica is quite inspired by Monkey Island, [with Mitch] considering it a children’s version of the older game. He goes on to describe Poptropica as a game with unique stories and puzzles, making up long-form experiences that require time and effort to experience, which players are willing to put in…

Next, the guys compare Poptropica to The Sims games by Electronic Arts, commenting on the world-building aspect of games and how there’s no age limit for wanting some of that. Mitch notes that Poptropica Worlds is a little like that, where you get to build your own house and avatar. For almost ten years, this was the most requested feature for Poptropica: a way to build their own space, which finally came as houses on Worlds. Such a feature, of having a thing that is one’s own, transcends age and gender…

Mitch talks about how his favorite books and movies as a kid all had an edge of darkness in them, recalling the classic storybook Where The Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak. This feels true of Poptropica as well, he says: it looks cartoonish, but it’s not a superficial experience – there is depth there for the kids who are paying attention to it.

From the PHB’s summary of Mitch Krpata’s appearance on The Oddball Show podcast

You can also hear the podcast interview in the video below, or read our summary in this PHB post. It’s lengthy, but quite insightful!


It’s interesting to see how Poptropica has evolved in some ways from some of these original Creators’ imaginations, yet has stayed the same in other ways. What resonated with you? What features do you think Poptropica should keep, bring back, or do away with? Share your thoughts in the comments and on our PHC Discord server!

And #ThanksKinney for making this strange yet wonderful adventure for us all. Happy 13th birthday, Poptropica! 🎈🎉

~Slanted Fish 🐠

Blast from the Past, PHB Specials

Preserving Poptropica post-Flash 💥

Hey, Poptropicans—welcome to 2020. As you may have heard, this year will bring about the end of Adobe Flash, the engine that much of Poptropica runs on. The implications are huge for this game, and we’ve already seen it affecting 30 of the oldest islands and many more features.

Here on the PHB, we’ve mentioned the Flash issue here and there, but now we’re taking the opportunity to make a whole post hashing out what’s happening, what it means, and where it’s all going. So let’s get started!

1. Where are the old islands?

In July 2019, Poptropica removed 30 islands from the map. They were all considered “old school islands”: Poptropica’s earliest islands, created and released from 2007–2013, which were built using ActionScript 2 (AS2), a programming language primarily used for the Adobe Flash Player platform.

The good news is, you can still play the old school islands using the Old Island Directory created by the glitcher idk. Although they’re currently inaccessible from the game itself, it’s possible that the old islands will return. Poptropica’s reason for taking them down, for the time being, was because they were “causing a lot of problems for players.”

2. Poptropica’s Promises

On the first day of the new year, Poptropica posted the following on Instagram: “2020 is going to great [sic] — a non-Flash version of the game, new islands, the return of some old islands, and so much more!!!” (Our emphasis added.) So, there’s hope yet that the old islands will return—but as the Instagram post indicates, it may not be all of them.

A fan-made Poptropica map with most of the islands, created by idk.

We’re not sure which ones are coming back and which ones might not make it, nor do we know why, but perhaps there’s only so much they can work with. Still, in addition to directly playing them via the Old Island Directory, you can also relive their memories with the PHB’s collection of Island Guides.

3. What does it mean that Flash is going away?

Adobe Flash Player was an instrumental engine for a lot of the early internet, particularly for games, video, and animations. Poptropica is among the many websites that used Flash, just like other popular game sites of the 2000s and 2010s, like Club Penguin and Neopets. For those of us who’ve grown up playing these games, losing Flash is not just saying goodbye to outdated technology, but watching whole worlds from our childhoods crumble away. RIP. 😢

And yet, Flash is going away simply because tech has evolved for the better—modern web browsers have adapted to HTML5, and the end of Flash also means better security and battery life. So, if Poptropica is to continue, they’ll need to keep up with the tech and move off of Flash… which is what they’ve been working on for the past few years, even though this has meant fewer islands and more cosmetic changes—and yes, even the seemingly odd creation of Poptropica Worlds, built with Unity and launched in 2017.

Newer islands, which have a larger screen and ambient music, were built with ActionScript 3 (AS3), which is more compatible with current desktop standards as well as the rise of mobile applications. We started calling these islands SUIs, which stands for Sound-Updated Islands.

In 2013, Poptropica launched a beta version of 24 Carrot as an SUI called BETA Carrotene, and after fixing up some bugs, they were ready to roll out Virus Hunter, the first official SUI. From then on, all islands were released as SUIs, and sometimes the Creators even went back and re-made a former island, like Time Tangled or Mythology, into an SUI. Unlike older islands, these newer SUIs are able to survive without Flash, which is why islands now come as SUIs.

4. Poptropica’s Progress

Poptropica Worlds was intended to be Poptropica’s solution to the post-Flash dilemma, but for some reason, things didn’t quite pan out. By 2019, it wasn’t being updated anymore and was even actively hidden from the homepage. Instead, many of Worlds’ standout features have since been integrated into the original Poptropica, like device syncing and player clubhouses.

Poptropica even wrote in their recap of 2019 that many of that year’s updates were “a really important part of the conversion process for getting the game off of Flash” suggesting that their post-Flash solution will focus not on Worlds, but on the original Poptropica. Some more of these updates over the past year include a new layout for friends and the store, SUI-ified common rooms, and plus, who could forget the adorable pets?

However, the shiny new things are eclipsed by the loss of many beloved classic features that may or may not be compatible with the future of technology—such as the old school islands.

We’ve also lost a lot of old costumes and items, mostly from the store, though some are gradually coming back through each new monthly rotation of store items. We’ve lost friend features like the ability to add by username, viewing medallions, and even the Multiverse (and tribe!) party rooms. Island photos were replaced by Photo Booth pics, but even the Photo Booth is currently down, with no word on when it may return.

Still, if Poptropica’s previous statements are worth their salt, perhaps there’s still hope yet for a brighter Poptropica post-Flash…

5. Poptropica’s Future

As Poptropica has stated here and there, they are working on porting the game over to newer technology, so that it can live on even after the plug is pulled on Flash. Poptropica Original is here to stay, continuing its legacy both in the web browser and now on mobile devices.

We’re likely to see at least some of the old islands return, based on Poptropica’s Instagram post mentioned above. And they’ve mentioned working on “new islands” as well, including, most recently, the announcement that Zomberry Island will be back—with a new level!

Also, though Poptropica hasn’t confirmed anything specific, perhaps we can still hold out some hope for the return of some of the beloved features we’ve lost, or at least see them morph into viable alternatives.

After all, even Realms disappeared for over a year before it finally returned in late 2018. Meanwhile, Multiverse may be gone, but now we have player clubhouses (introduced in late 2018) to meet up with friends. While they’ve still got some work to do to really make clubhouses as big of a hit as Multiverse was (namely, being able to easily find specific friends whose houses you want to pop into), it’s a promising start to a new era for Poptropica.

Whatever happens, we’ll be here to watch it all go down.

With cautious optimism,

—the PHB 💙

Blast from the Past

2019 Rewind: Flashing New, Slashing Old

As we wind down on 2019, we’re going back into an old routine: looking back on the year that was, and recapping the highlights (and lowlights) of Poptropica and the PHB community. This year: flashing new, slashing old.

Poptropica recently shared their own recap of 2019, where they explained many of this year’s game updates, which were largely aesthetic changes, as “a really important part of the conversion process for getting the game off of Flash.” As a refresher: Poptropica was originally built on Flash, an older technology that will lose browser support by the end of next year. So, for some time now, Poptropica has been working on rebuilding away from Flash.

This process has brought about some fun design changes to the game over the past year—but there have been losses, too. Let’s hit rewind and get to it!


Poptropica kicked off a year of visual updates with two big changes in January: a new friends profile, and highly anticipated personal pets (and later, with accessories, too!). While the pets were generally well received, the friends profile redesign came with mixed reviews, as many of the original features were dropped, like adding friends by username or viewing island medallions. Showcasing a photo booth album was a nice new addition until the photo booth randomly disappeared later in the year.

In February, Poptropica gave members another perk: double the credits from the daily Wheel of Loot. It seemed silly at first, but then in March, the in-game Store got a makeover—and while the visuals were a big part, there were some other changes as well, and they had to do with membership: even members had to pay for store items with credits, and many of the items became for members only, even ones that used to be available to all.

Also in March, Home Island received the first of 2019’s various redecorating schemes with a pastel spring look!

Plus, a new face on the Creators’ Blog finally introduced herself as Blue Tooth, Poptropica’s official blogger. She isn’t quite as active as Poptropica’s former social media manager, Skinny Moon, but her engagement with the community has involved a more active Instagram page (and a less active Twitter feed). With it, she delivers Pop news in a fun, excited tone, as well as featured fan art and look book outfits, including a short-lived “Look of the Week” series and the never-delivered “Clubhouse of the Week” promise.

April brought about drastic changes to the map, with new categories that made much more sense than the previous update in 2017, and Flash-made islands relegated to the end. These “Old School Islands” met an even worse fate a few months down the line, when they were removed from the map entirely. RIP—but perhaps not forever. Fortunately, there’s still a way to access them unofficially, via idk’s Old Island Directory.

Indeed, this was a year of makeovers, as even the Poptropica homepage got a facelift with a bright green play button and new art (that’s gone through multiple changes since then, too). Most noteworthily, Poptropica Worlds is no longer linked to on the homepage, though it can still be accessed here. It seems safe to assume they’ve quietly stopped working on Worlds, considering its lack of updates and the activity happening on the original Pop instead—including a steady stream of ad games and prizes.

Further confirming the theory that Pop Worlds is a thing of the past: in May, Poptropica launched syncing between devices for Original Poptropica on both the computer and mobile app, which was originally the big selling point of Worlds. At least it shows the Creators are serious about keeping Poptropica accessible in this modern age of gaming on the go!

Still, where are the new islands? Well, the first one of 2019 was nothing much—in June, Snagglemast Island replaced the previous tutorial, Monkey Wrench.

But July came with this year’s hottest new content: Reality TV: Wild Safari Island, a successor to the original Reality TV Island (which was one of the ~30 victims of the purge of old school islands). It didn’t quite live up to the hype of Poptropica’s previous islands, but you can read more on that in our review.

August was a quiet month for Pop, but things picked up again in September with several updates: common rooms finally upgraded to bigger screens and got arcade game stations, Poptropica celebrated its 12th birthday with a strange cake car costume, and Home Island got two more makeovers: fall and Halloween. Suitable store items accompanied the changing of seasons.

Poptropica’s next island adventure was confirmed in October—a remake of Zomberry Island is coming, though later than anticipated, seeing as it was promised for “later this year” and the year is wrapping up. Still, we’ll be waiting for it in 2020!

In November, Home Island saw yet another remodel, casting quite a charm with its magical, wizardly theme! Also that month, Poptropica revamped its island tour pages in a similar vein to the PHB’s Island Guides.

Poptropica wrapped up 2019 by wrapping up some extra presents through its 12 Days of Member Gifts in December, which returned for a second year. Plus, the homepage saw a couple more art pieces to represent Poptropica. And yup, another Home Island overhaul for winter—that’s five remodels this year!

And now, let’s turn to the next half of this rewind…


Last year, we commented on how little the Creators posted on their blog in comparison to the past, and even in comparison to the PHB. Fortunately, things have gotten better since Blue Tooth joined the scene. While the Creators’ Blog has hidden its post counter, here at the PHB we’ve delivered 135 posts to you in 2019, and they’ve been some good ones.

For starters, in early 2019 we took a look at the direction Poptropica has been taking over the previous few years in an op-ed that asked the question, is Poptropica turning into Mocktropica Island? Echoing popular sentiment from the Pop community, we lamented how the lack of new islands to play—core to Poptropica’s identity—has taken a backseat in production priorities to make way for the hyper-focus on visual updates.

On a lighter note, the PHB played around with the idea of a Poptropica fighting game, Smash Bros-style: “Smash! Crackle! POP!” It was just an April Fools’ prank, but we had fun with it—and we hope you did too!

We also brought back our annual Readers’ Survey, and the results were announced in May. Among the stats, we found that PHB readers are getting older (15–18 was the highest age range), many discovered the game in its earlier years (2007 was the top answer), and many of you found the PHB in the past couple of years (2016 led the chart on this one).

The PHB also welcomed a variety of excellent guest posts this year, including: “A tribute to Myron van Buren” by Trusty Leopard, “Unsatisfying Island Endings” by Comical Carrot (which won Best Guest Post of 2019 in our Poppies Awards), “Pop Petition: Make Mighty Action Force Multiplayer” by Beefy Penguin, “What makes a Poptropica island?” by Bony Bones, the four-part ‘My Place in Poptropica’ series “The Chronicles of Shiny Bird” by ShinyB1rd (naturally), among others. Give them a read or a revisit!

Marking the PHB’s 11th birthday in July, we held our annual Poptropica awards event, the Poppies, with a livestream to announce the winners you all voted for and a party to celebrate. Hosting a party on Poptropica was a bit trickier than in the past with Multiverse officially gone from the game after the friends profile update, but MM and idk (our Popular Poptropican of 2019 winner) helped us all find a backdoor way (which unfortunately no longer works) to access the much-missed feature. Anyway, catch the recap of the party and winners here!

We also celebrated our traditional Halloween costume competition, now in its 11th year, with a “Heavenly & Hellish” theme. The winners of PHB’s Halloween Eleven did indeed seem to come from the highest heights and lowest depths, with Jean of Pop’s “Heavenly Healer” and Quick Fang’s “Red-eyed Zombie Carnie” being crowned respectively. Even the PHB staff joined in the fun with costumes of their own! You can find all that and more in the PHB’s recently updated Look Book (i.e. Costumes page), which is now easier to navigate.

Speaking of this community’s creativity, this is also our third year of hosting Community Creations, our monthly series where we feature works of fan art based around a theme. Let’s commemorate that with a gallery of some of this year’s top pieces, with one drawn from each month. (December’s features will be announced on the first of the month, of course.)

And finally, we figured 2019 was a good a time as any to look back on the past decade in Poptropica, so we dug through the archives and gathered up what became The Poptropica Yearbook, accessible via the Pop Plus page.

This PHB project compiled Rewind posts of previous years as well as created new ones for years we hadn’t summarized before, and placed them all in one convenient location for Poptropicans to reminisce. And now, as we close another chapter, this 2019 Rewind will be remembered in its pages, too.


So that’s 2019! We gained some, we lost some, but we press on. To recap:

  • What’s new: Pets, friends profile layout (now with sticker wall, photo booth album, message board, mood, background, likes, clubhouse link), store layout, homepage, device syncing on Poptropica Original, official island tour pages, five Home Island makeovers, Snagglemast Island (tutorial), and Reality TV: Wild Safari Island—our only real island of the year, and a rather mediocre one at that.
  • What we’ve lost: 29 “Old School Islands,” Multiverse, various friends features (adding by username, island album photos, viewing all friends instead of only about 10, island medallions, pop quizzes), photo booth (so much for the new photo booth album on the friends profiles…), and, while still accessible, Poptropica Worlds has been quietly hidden away and left inactive.

With 2020 bringing about the end of Flash, the Poptropica Creators have been promising that they’re working on rebuilding Poptropica with newer technology that’ll keep the game around for years to come. That’s meant a different pace of updates in the last few years—without many new islands to tell new stories, it feels for some like Poptropica is missing its storytelling magic. But a new year—in fact, a new decade—is on the horizon, and perhaps that means new life for Poptropica. Stick around, and we’ll all see!

✨🎆 Cheers to the next decade! 🥳✨

💙 the PHB team

Slanted Fish, Spotted Dragon, Lucky Joker, Fierce Flyer,
Sporty Boa & Gentle Dolphin

Advertisements, Blast from the Past

A musical end to a year of makeovers

Hey Poptropicans! From all of us at the PHB, we hope you all had a great holiday season with family and friends. 🎄🎉✨

Over on the Creators’ Blog, you’ll find a post highlighting some of the biggest Poptropica events of the past year. Their 2019 highlights mention:

  • the arrival of the pet barn (and a hint at “more fluffy friends” to come),
  • the store redesign (this and more were in preparation for moving off of Flash, they say),
  • device syncing for Poptropica Original (originally a big draw for the now-inactive Pop Worlds), and
  • Reality TV: Wild Safari Island (“uniquely awesome” for letting players earn unlimited credits with replays).

The post ends by saying “big plans” await in 2020—including the upcoming Zomberry Island remake!

We’ll be posting our annual Poptropica & PHB Rewind on New Year’s Eve, so stay tuned for that as well!


Poptropica’s last ad of this year happens to come from the first cartoon of next year: Owl House. To begin your adventure, enter the titular Owl House and talk to Eda. She will tell you that King has been kidnapped by a demon and give you her staff. All you need to do is move your mouse left and right to move around and avoid falling monsters.

Saving King and winning the game will reward you with two bewitching prizes: the Flying Staff and the King Friend Follower.


With the end of 2019 comes the end of the 2010s decade. To celebrate this momentous occasion, Poptropica music composer Jeff Heim is counting down the days by releasing 10 music tracks to Soundcloud! At this point, his playlist contains three previously unreleased Poptropica soundtracks, with possibly more to come.

The first Poptropica track in the album is called “Vampire’s Transformation.” Although the title implies that this song was made for Vampire’s Curse Island, it actually debuted in Poptropica Worlds’s Greek Sea Odyssey. You can hear it when you arrive at Mount Olympus before your big encounter with Zeus. Here’s to hoping that we get a Vampire’s Curse remaster soon!

https://soundcloud.com/jeff-heim/vampires-transformation

The second track is called “Arabian Palace.” Unlike “Vampire’s Transformation,” this track is currently in the game—it can be heard in the sultan’s palace in “Arabian Nights, Episode 3: Careful What You Wish For.”

https://soundcloud.com/jeff-heim/arabian-palace

The third track is called “Drive” and could once be heard at the start of the Flying Ace Race on Monkey Wrench Island, which no longer exists as it was replaced by another tutorial, Snagglemast Island, earlier this year.

https://soundcloud.com/jeff-heim/drive

It’s nice discovering these tracks, and if you like them, I recommend also listening to Jeff’s non-Poptropica music, which you can find on his Soundcloud.

Thank you for reading, and have a good day!

—Gentle Dolphin🐬

Blast from the Past

Birthday blog and bugs be gone

Hey, everyone! September may be ending soon, but Poptropica’s 12th birthday celebration is still going strong! In addition to the free cake car costume, the Creators’ Blog is also celebrating with a special post highlighting some of the biggest moments from Poptropica’s early years.

Adventures...on a blimp!

This mini-retrospective post covers the first five years of Poptropica’s life (2007–2011). It’s interesting that they mention old islands that were recently taken away (though perhaps not permanently), and they even feature an ASG account! (Perhaps they’re okay with this aspect of glitching?)

We’ve shared their post below, but you can read the original on the Creators’ Blog. Without further ado, let the nostalgia begin:

Poptropica is officially TWELVE YEARS OLD! Can you believe it!? Here’s a look back at some of our favorite moments from the past twelve years!

2007: Poptropica was created by none other than Jeff Kinney, author of the Diary of a Wimpy Kid book series! Do you remember what the first island was?

Pop Blog 2008

2008: The Poptropica Blog started! That’s right, we’ve been blogging about all things Poptropica since 2008! Also, some seriously stellar islands came out, including Nabooti Island and Spy Island!

Avatar Studio

2009: Multiverse and Avatar Studio. Did you know the clubhouses in today’s Poptropica use a lot of the same technology as Multiverse?

And good ol’ Poptropica Avatar Studio. It doesn’t work quite the way it used to, but you can still check it out HERE.

Poptrpoica Map 2010

2010: Islands, islands, and more islands! Which of these islands was NOT released that year: Cryptids, 24 Carrot, Steamworks, Skullduggery, or Reality TV?

Poptropica Guidebook

2011: Poptropica: The Official Guidebook was released! We also announced our first line of toys, were named one of the top 50 websites of the year, AND released a few more islands!

Phew! That was a really amazing first five years of Poptropica! Stay tuned for our next installment of Poptropica favorites. In the meantime, get on over to Poptropica to get your FREE 12th birthday gift!

A part 2 covering the rest is likely coming soon, based on the post’s ending. For a more in-depth look into Poptropica’s history, check out our Poptropica Yearbook posts here on the PHB!

popyb


In a recent “Bug Fix Friday” post, Blue Tooth made note of some recent updates to smooth out the gameplay experience. The chase scene from Arabian Nights: Episode 3 is working properly, and the game screen now shrinks to fit on mobile devices. Nice.

skyChase

The end of this post tells readers to keep their eyes peeled for future updates. What kinds of updates do you think will be coming? Possibly the return of a beloved creepy island? Only time will tell…

Thank you for reading, and have a good day!

—Gentle Dolphin🐬