Creators, PHB Specials

Q&A with Poptropica’s CEO, Abhi Arya 🎤🤴

Hey Poptropicans — you asked, and Poptropica has answered!

A while back, we asked you to bring your questions for Poptropica’s CEO, Abhi Arya. We selected some for him to answer, and he has responded!

We may have tweaked a few of the fan questions for clarity, but Mr. Arya’s words below are verbatim. For a few of the answers, the PHB asked for clarification, and Ms. Natalie Shahmiri, the general manager of Poptropica, stepped in to answer on his behalf, so you’ll see her responses too. Without further ado, let’s pop all of the questions!


Introduction

Emma I: How does it feel to head up such a great game that has made so many childhoods?

Abhi: It feels great. Whenever I am in a room with Poptropica fans, I hear great kudos. Having association with a recognised game that continues to excite the gaming generation is a proud feeling. But I am not alone – I have a great team supporting me in this journey – in fact our game designers, developers and product team are much more passionate about Poptropica and they push me to do better for our players.

Theo (of Dimension Bros): How are Poptropicans so strong?

Abhi: Rumor has it that they descended from dinosaurs. Some people have said birds, which kind of are dinosaurs? Or maybe it’s just sheer willpower and determination. That’s probably it.

Dino DNA: Won’t find any cloning materials here.

The Future of the Game

Magniventris: What does 2021 hold for Poptropica? Will there be brand new islands, or will the focus be entirely on porting old islands to Haxe? If it’s on porting, how many islands do you project will be converted by the end of next year?

Abhi: We’re working on a mix of both, plus some remasters of the old islands. We’re also looking at ways to allow players to access the old islands once Flash isn’t widely supported anymore.

Natalie: Our current audience plays a big part in how we approach converting islands too. For example, the remastered Mythology island is a departure from the island you grew up with. It’s linear and definitely simpler (but still not too easy for a younger kid!). We have a lot to weigh when creating new content, from special events to remastered islands, so we don’t really know yet how many islands will be converted by next year. That’s also why we’re looking at options to ensure our older fans can still play the original Poptropica islands. We know how much the Poptropica you grew up with means to you and want to make sure you can always play that version.

The remastered Mythology Island on Haxe deviates from the original.

Emma I: Will non-members be able to access old islands anytime soon, and when can we expect that to happen?

Abhi: The original islands use some old technologies that make it harder for us to support in a live environment. Limiting it to members-only keeps our systems from being overwhelmed and allows us to focus on the long-term decisions of how to keep them available. We’ll share more by the start of 2021.

Short Glove: Will player names be customizable from a prescripted list in Haxe, like they were in Flash? (Right now, only a handful of names are possible in Haxe based on the default character you first choose when making an account, but many more options were available in Flash.) (Editor’s note: Since this question was asked and answered, the Friends Beta released in Haxe with the option to change one’s name.)

Abhi: It’s something we’ve definitely been considering. We’re working on optimizing a lot of the player features right now, like the ability to add friends by username. We’re also working on some new ideas for player dashboards, which may incorporate customizable names or use usernames instead.

Small Beginnings: This was our very first attempt at designing your friends profile page.

Bee: Will there ever be a multiplayer option for playing through Poptropica islands with friends?

Abhi: Adding multiplayer to the older islands would be a little tricky since they were designed for a single-player experience, but we’re actively testing how to do this in new ways.

Purple Paw: Will the Photo Booth, Costumizer, and old Friends profiles be brought back? Why were these features taken out in the first place?

Abhi: The photo booth and old friends’ profiles weren’t very popular and were pretty dated. That’s the tough thing when you have a popular game for over 10 years, some things just start to feel out of place, especially for a new generation of players. Whenever we make these decisions we look at the data: what are users engaging with? If something no longer resonates with players we look at how we can update it or sometimes make the tough decision to remove it from the game.

Natalie: Engagement with things like the photo booth and old friend profile was less than 10% of the players. They were definitely fun features but as gaming has evolved, we need to evolve with it. We want to reintegrate features like that, but in a way that makes sense for today’s players. 

Invisible Ring: What’s the plan for Poptropica Worlds? Will there be more islands there, or will it eventually fuse with Poptropica Original?

Abhi: We had to pause development on Poptropica Worlds so we could focus on the conversion of Poptropica from Flash to Haxe. We’re still working on a plan for Poptropica Worlds, but for now, our focus is still on Poptropica.

The Pop Creators are focusing on Poptropica Original, not Poptropica Worlds.

Maxx: Will the old islands be adapted for the Poptropica app (iOS and Google Play)? (I really enjoyed playing Cryptids and Big Nate for the nostalgia factor, and would really like to replay them on the iPad.)

Abhi: Some of the older islands won’t be available on mobile in their original form. They were built using a version of ActionScript from prior to mobile games even existing! Since they can’t be converted there aren’t a lot of options outside of working on a way for players to still access and play them after Flash is no longer actively supported.

Mess of a Being: When recreating old Flash islands for Haxe, will you consider making changes to the stories, like with the new-ish 24 Carrot Island on Poptropica Worlds?

Abhi: Yes, this is definitely in the plans. We’re also tweaking some of the islands since we know there are spots that were too hard or confusing for players. Mythology Island that comes out in November will be the first island we’ve converted that will have changes to it.

Editor’s note: The remastered Mythology Island came out on Haxe ahead of schedule last Friday, October 30. Read more about the release and initial community feedback here!

Aphrodite now gives up her precious vanity mirror without a challenge.

Fandom Fun

wow: What do you think about the Poptropica fandom community?

Abhi: We wouldn’t be where we are today if it weren’t for our fans. We’re actually bringing back our VIP program to help elevate our super fans. Stay tuned to the Poptropica Blog for more details coming out soon.

Theo (of Dimension Bros): Do you keep up with certain Poptropica fans’ postings (blogs, Instagram artists, YouTube channels, etc)? If so, which ones?

Abhi: We definitely do and Dimension Bros is one of them! We see almost everything tagged with Poptropica and regularly share our favorites among the Pop Creators. We’re also working to share them more on our blog and social media.

Incredible Fire: Can we have another Create Your Dream Island contest? This monumental contest that gave us Arabian Nights Island happened 7 years ago, and many fans today would love the chance to participate.

Abhi: Definitely! How about after this interview gets posted we start the contest?

IsaacEntertains (of Dimension Bros): Since a few fans have shared their lists, we’d like to know: who does the Poptropica team declare are the top 10 hottest Poptropica characters?

Abhi: That’s like asking a parent which kid is their favorite. 


Creative Process

Emma I: What does the process of making an island look like?

Abhi: We actually just did a blog post about this for the Zomberry Special Event. To start off we talk about different story ideas and iterate on that until we have a story the whole team likes. From there we start storyboards so everyone knows the sequence of events and has an idea of what each scene will look like. The developers use the storyboards to start their initial coding while the artists start to make all the art and animations. There are a lot of meetings during those steps with feedback, changes, more feedback, and even more changes. It takes months for an island to be built because of how many scenes, mini-games, NPCs, and prizes need to be made. There’s also music that needs to be composed and of course, a lot of testing.

Artists use software to create in-game animations for Poptropica.

GEAR: How long does it take to make one character, from their initial design to putting them in the game?

Abhi: Anywhere from 1-2 weeks. Characters with a lot of animations take the longest.

GEAR: Are you hiring? How do people get involved in working with Poptropica, and what kind of skills/talents do you look for?

Abhi: If someone is new to game design and development it’s best if they keep a lookout for when we post internship opportunities. We look for all types of skillsets, from artists to animators to developers. Outside of game development, we have marketing, which includes making videos and social media posts, and analysts who help go through game data to see how things in the game are performing. There are a lot of ways to get involved with Poptropica, it just depends on what part of the game industry you want to get involved with.

The Poptropica team in 2016 celebrating the game’s 9th birthday with cake at the office.

PHB: What does the Poptropica team currently look like now? How many people are on the team and doing what kinds of work?

Abhi: The Poptropica team is made up of team members all around the world. We have artists, game developers, web developers, graphic designers, testers, and more. Maintaining and growing a game like Poptropica requires a lot of people!

PHB: Fans have noticed that Poptropica’s newer (and fewer) islands lack the depth of storytelling found in many of its older islands. Why has Poptropica strayed from this original vision, and will you return to this key element which made the game unique?

Abhi: Storytelling is still core to what Poptropica is and always will be. Creating a full island story and experience can take anywhere from 3-6 months and requires the full team. Since we’re still working on converting the old islands we’ve been creating some smaller and shorter experiences so you have something to do in-between the islands being converted.

The Zomberry Hero special event was a smaller and shorter experience released in October 2020 while island conversion was in progress.

Dangerous Icicle: Why are there so many ads in the Poptropica browser? (The whole screen is littered with ads, even ads for Poptropica, and the new video ads in between scenes were not well received.)

Abhi: We added more ad units to the game browser and in-between scenes due to demand. A lot of the new units, like in-between scenes, are being tested and may not stay permanently.

Natalie: The demand for more ads came from advertisers. COVID-19 has made most businesses change how they approach advertising and that impacted how our partners work with us. While we know players aren’t crazy about the ads, advertising is part of what funds the development of Poptropica. We’re always working to find the right balance.

With the recent inclusion of video ads, it is possible to encounter a full screen of ads while playing Poptropica. Sometimes the ads are for Poptropica itself!

Tyler N: What is Jeff Kinney’s involvement with Poptropica these days?

Abhi: He isn’t actively involved at the current moment since most of our efforts have been focused on converting the game from Flash to Haxe instead of new islands. Plus, he’s pretty busy with his book series!

Tyler N: What, if any, do plans for a Poptropica movie, TV show, or animated series look like right now? (It was hinted at in the Q&A with the previous Poptropica CEO.)

Abhi: This is something that we’re always considering. It takes time to make partnerships like this happen and isn’t something we’ve ruled out.

MaryannTheConqueror: Are there any plans for more Poptropica merch, and is there a way fans (especially the nostalgic ones) could be involved in creating/suggesting ideas for that? Many have some very cool ideas!

Abhi: We have a new shop launching in November and yes, we definitely want suggestions! We’ll let you all know more on the Poptropica Blog.

Editor’s note: Since answering this Q&A, the Poptropica Creators’ Blog has shared about their plans to sell merch and invited fans to give suggestions!

MaryannTheConqueror: Are the Poptropica Creators OK with small-scale sales of fan-made merch (such as through Etsy or at conventions, or print-on-demand sites like RedBubble)?

Abhi: I love fan art and creations that are inspired by Poptropica. Using our art and logo files for merch isn’t okay though.


The Big Questions

PHB: Will Poptropica consider adapting its content for a progressively older player base? Though many started playing Poptropica as kids, many fans are now teens and young adults. And as Poptropica Creators have shared before, Poptropica stories have the potential to carry more than just a superficial experience.

Abhi: It’s an interesting idea and we often talk about how we can extend the stories outside of the main game. The core of our audience is still on the younger side, similar to when you probably started playing. It’s who the game is made for, so we have to stay true to that as our core focus.

Natalie: The majority of the Poptropica players are still under 13. We have over a million kids playing every month and while the PHB fandom is big, it doesn’t encompass all of our players. Similar to when a lot of you started playing, a lot of our players today are introduced to and play Poptropica in school. They also discover us through advertisements on kid-specific websites.

Oh Baby: Young at heart is usually good enough.

Mess of a Being and Tiny Bean: What do you have to say to criticism about the ending of Monster Carnival Island, which some fans have found problematic? (This fan video highlights the issues, explaining that Ringmaster Raven’s portrayal plays into ugly stereotypes and that he is given disproportionately unfair treatment by the townsfolk.)

Abhi: I totally get it. This is definitely one of those instances where you know the intent doesn’t align with the issue and you have to ask, “How was this affected by implicit bias?” We’re actually auditing all the islands for this reason and have already revised Monster Carnival for its conversion to Haxe. I appreciate that players bring this to our attention. It’s the only way we can all collectively move forward in the right direction.

Ringmaster Raven deserved better.

PHB: What is the current vision of Poptropica in terms of how it hopes to impact the next generation?

Abhi: I want Poptropica to continue to inspire young fans around the world. Gaming has changed a lot since Poptropica was first introduced and I’m proud of the fact that kids still love our characters and stories. Seeing videos of people coming to play Poptropica after 10 years and their enthusiasm for the game is amazing. All of the fan art (and fanfiction) is inspiring and shows that Poptropica holds a place in players’ hearts.

Mess of a Being: Are there characters in Poptropica that the Creators see as LGBT? Who might they be? (For fan discussion on this topic, see Dimension Bros’ video on analyzing queerness in Poptropica.)

Abhi: Poptropica always has been and always will be inclusive. It’s part of why we want players to be able to customize their characters however they want and why we removed the gender selector when setting up an account. I don’t think we have any characters where their gender identity or sexual orientation plays a role in the story, but it’s something I think we should consider for future islands. Representation matters and we’ll always work to create a place where everyone feels like they belong.

And finally…

GEAR: Thoughts on Dr. Beev?

Abhi: Dr. Beev is an enigma. He does periodically show up for parties though.

Nice gnawing you too, Dr. Beev.

You made it to the end! Thanks so much to Abhi and Natalie for joining us on this Q&A and taking the time to address some fan questions and concerns. It’s assuring to hear there are big plans for Poptropica even beyond the end of Flash gaming!

What did you all think of their responses? What further questions do you have for the Poptropica team? Share your thoughts in the comments below and on the PHC Discord!

— the Poptropica Help Blog —

PHB Specials

Meet the Poptropica Pals, an official university student club! 🏫🐏

Hey Poptropicans, we’ve got a special feature for you! Have you ever thought about bringing Poptropica to school? Meet the Poptropica Pals, an official university student club who’s managed to do just that!

The Poptropica Pals operate at the University of Rhode Island (URI) and the club has been officially recognized by their student senate since fall 2019. Check out their Instagram @uri_poptropica_pals, and read on for the PHB’s interview with the Pals to hear about their experiences!

Peep the Poptropica Help Blog shout-out on the Pals’ Instagram!

The PHB reached out to the Pals and they graciously took the time to share a bit about their club with us. Here’s what they had to say:

PHB: Thanks for your openness in sharing! Let’s begin with the basics. What are your names, years, and majors?

Pals: The leadership of the Poptropica Pals includes: the president, Benjamin Cloutier, senior, communications major; vice president Trey DiGioia, senior, acting major; treasurer Eric Creton, junior, marketing major; secretary Athena Nakrosis, senior, directing major; and parliamentarian Mirielle Jaser, sophomore, oceanic geology major.

Swipe for more Poptropica Pals joining the frame!

PHB: How did you get into the Poptropica fandom? How has your experience been?

Pals: We all started playing Potropica when when we were in elementary school, and for the most part have been keeping up and playing new islands ever since. The only poor part of our experiences has been the introduction of paid memberships, and the loss of some classic islands. Many of us are die-hard fans of Jeff Kinney and his Diary of a Wimpy Kid children’s book series, and this only serves to fuel the flame that is our love for Poptropica.

PHB: Why did you start the URI Poptropica Pals? What did the process of starting the club look like?

Pals: We needed to campaign to get our school to approve the club’s formation. This required a list of at least 10 group members, their contact information, and a list of elected members of the club’s executive board. We created a flier and started getting the word out that we wished to form a club at the University of Rhode Island.

We initially designed the club as the “K-Poptropicans,” a club to focus on both Poptropica and K-pop. However, at our initial meeting with Rhody Senate, there was another club up for review called “The K-Pop Club,” and we thought it best to rebrand and stick our club to one main theme: Poptropica. Although not the entirety of the student senate was on board, we got the majority approval and we were named an official school club (but at the lowest level). Since then, we have kept the club running and have recently been recognized as a next tier club due to the amount of time we have been an official club.

Poptropica meets the Rhode Island Rams and other aspects of Rhody student life on the Pals’ Instagram page!

PHB: How many have joined the Poptropica Pals? How do people respond to your recruitment?

Pals: The Pals have around 35 members currently, though attendance varies. The issue with recruitment is that it is hard to get incoming freshmen to join clubs now that the COVID-19 crisis has plagued us all. We had planned to attend the club festival on the first night of term, but that was canceled and the club took a real hit as a result. We still get the occasional email or DM on our club’s Instagram, but having that club fair would have helped in gravitating new students towards our club.

PHB: What do Poptropica Pals club meetings look like?

Pals: There are three types of meetings the Poptropica Pals hold: Typical, Executive, and Outings.

Typical meetings are meetings in which the whole club is invited, and we usually meet at the campus library, although other computer labs have been used in our campus’s main building. We usually spend the first half of our meetings discussing Poptropica news and any tips or fun easter eggs our members may have found, and we often play games in the island common rooms. Customizing our characters and trading clothing items occurs during this part too.

The second half of these typical meetings usually just entails free time, where members can play through islands or talk, and eat snacks that don’t make a mess. Of course, with the virus, these meetings have decreased in attendance, but a few online gatherings have taken place in a safe, socially distant manner.

Executive meetings are those where only the executive board members are present. Here we often discuss and plan future meetings, as well as speed-run islands to try to beat personal best times. These executive meetings help bring us closer together and bond in ways that expand the sense of community and provide us with the interpersonal skills to lead the club in a collaborative environment. Snacks are always available.

Outings are our most fun meetings. Whether it’s a trip to scope out a new computer lab, or a Live-Action-Roleplay session of the end sequence from 24 Carrot Island, our outings are a way to bring the club together and deviate screen time from time we actually spend together. These meetings can often be small groups of 5–10 people, and are held both at random and at the request of a member. The Poptropica Pals aren’t just named that because of alliteration. We really are pals — and even more than that, we’re a family.

PHB: What advice do you have for other college students interested in starting their own clubs, whether for Poptropica or otherwise?

Pals: Never let them tell you no. When you’re standing before 20+ upperclassmen and trying to explain to them why your college needs a club for an online game designed for developing children, it’s easy to let them push you around, asking questions and looking down on you. The best thing you can do is stand tall with pride, and leave no doubt in their mind that this club is something that would make college better for you.

At the end of the day, even if they tell you no, DO IT ANYWAY! Even if it’s just you and a couple friends talking about Hot Wheels or eating different kinds of jelly beans. “The Hot Wheels Lovers” and “The Jelly Fellas” both sound like great clubs to me, and if it’s what makes you happy, DO IT. Even if it isn’t an official university recognized club like the URI Poptropica Pals, that doesn’t mean it’s not still a club!

If it makes you happy, “do it anyway!”

PHB: Anything else you’d like to add?

Pals: Feel free to follow us on social media — our club Instagram is @uri_poptropica_pals! Members of the executive board also run a non-affiliated meme page @poptropicaprobs.

Be yourself and people will like you.

Jeff Kinney

We hope you enjoyed this special segment with the collegiate Poptropica Pals! Thanks again to the Pals leaders for sharing with us.

Has Poptropica been a part of your school life? Share your thoughts and experiences in the comments and on the PHC Discord! For more community stories, check out the PHB’s My Place in Poptropica series.

— the Poptropica Help Blog —

Blast from the Past, PHB Specials

Preserving Poptropica post-Flash 💥

Hey, Poptropicans—welcome to 2020. As you may have heard, this year will bring about the end of Adobe Flash, the engine that much of Poptropica runs on. The implications are huge for this game, and we’ve already seen it affecting 30 of the oldest islands and many more features.

Here on the PHB, we’ve mentioned the Flash issue here and there, but now we’re taking the opportunity to make a whole post hashing out what’s happening, what it means, and where it’s all going. So let’s get started!

1. Where are the old islands?

In July 2019, Poptropica removed 30 islands from the map. They were all considered “old school islands”: Poptropica’s earliest islands, created and released from 2007–2013, which were built using ActionScript 2 (AS2), a programming language primarily used for the Adobe Flash Player platform.

The good news is, you can still play the old school islands using the Old Island Directory created by the glitcher idk. Although they’re currently inaccessible from the game itself, it’s possible that the old islands will return. Poptropica’s reason for taking them down, for the time being, was because they were “causing a lot of problems for players.”

2. Poptropica’s Promises

On the first day of the new year, Poptropica posted the following on Instagram: “2020 is going to great [sic] — a non-Flash version of the game, new islands, the return of some old islands, and so much more!!!” (Our emphasis added.) So, there’s hope yet that the old islands will return—but as the Instagram post indicates, it may not be all of them.

A fan-made Poptropica map with most of the islands, created by idk.

We’re not sure which ones are coming back and which ones might not make it, nor do we know why, but perhaps there’s only so much they can work with. Still, in addition to directly playing them via the Old Island Directory, you can also relive their memories with the PHB’s collection of Island Guides.

3. What does it mean that Flash is going away?

Adobe Flash Player was an instrumental engine for a lot of the early internet, particularly for games, video, and animations. Poptropica is among the many websites that used Flash, just like other popular game sites of the 2000s and 2010s, like Club Penguin and Neopets. For those of us who’ve grown up playing these games, losing Flash is not just saying goodbye to outdated technology, but watching whole worlds from our childhoods crumble away. RIP. 😢

And yet, Flash is going away simply because tech has evolved for the better—modern web browsers have adapted to HTML5, and the end of Flash also means better security and battery life. So, if Poptropica is to continue, they’ll need to keep up with the tech and move off of Flash… which is what they’ve been working on for the past few years, even though this has meant fewer islands and more cosmetic changes—and yes, even the seemingly odd creation of Poptropica Worlds, built with Unity and launched in 2017.

Newer islands, which have a larger screen and ambient music, were built with ActionScript 3 (AS3), which is more compatible with current desktop standards as well as the rise of mobile applications. We started calling these islands SUIs, which stands for Sound-Updated Islands.

In 2013, Poptropica launched a beta version of 24 Carrot as an SUI called BETA Carrotene, and after fixing up some bugs, they were ready to roll out Virus Hunter, the first official SUI. From then on, all islands were released as SUIs, and sometimes the Creators even went back and re-made a former island, like Time Tangled or Mythology, into an SUI. Unlike older islands, these newer SUIs are able to survive without Flash, which is why islands now come as SUIs.

4. Poptropica’s Progress

Poptropica Worlds was intended to be Poptropica’s solution to the post-Flash dilemma, but for some reason, things didn’t quite pan out. By 2019, it wasn’t being updated anymore and was even actively hidden from the homepage. Instead, many of Worlds’ standout features have since been integrated into the original Poptropica, like device syncing and player clubhouses.

Poptropica even wrote in their recap of 2019 that many of that year’s updates were “a really important part of the conversion process for getting the game off of Flash” suggesting that their post-Flash solution will focus not on Worlds, but on the original Poptropica. Some more of these updates over the past year include a new layout for friends and the store, SUI-ified common rooms, and plus, who could forget the adorable pets?

However, the shiny new things are eclipsed by the loss of many beloved classic features that may or may not be compatible with the future of technology—such as the old school islands.

We’ve also lost a lot of old costumes and items, mostly from the store, though some are gradually coming back through each new monthly rotation of store items. We’ve lost friend features like the ability to add by username, viewing medallions, and even the Multiverse (and tribe!) party rooms. Island photos were replaced by Photo Booth pics, but even the Photo Booth is currently down, with no word on when it may return.

Still, if Poptropica’s previous statements are worth their salt, perhaps there’s still hope yet for a brighter Poptropica post-Flash…

5. Poptropica’s Future

As Poptropica has stated here and there, they are working on porting the game over to newer technology, so that it can live on even after the plug is pulled on Flash. Poptropica Original is here to stay, continuing its legacy both in the web browser and now on mobile devices.

We’re likely to see at least some of the old islands return, based on Poptropica’s Instagram post mentioned above. And they’ve mentioned working on “new islands” as well, including, most recently, the announcement that Zomberry Island will be back—with a new level!

Also, though Poptropica hasn’t confirmed anything specific, perhaps we can still hold out some hope for the return of some of the beloved features we’ve lost, or at least see them morph into viable alternatives.

After all, even Realms disappeared for over a year before it finally returned in late 2018. Meanwhile, Multiverse may be gone, but now we have player clubhouses (introduced in late 2018) to meet up with friends. While they’ve still got some work to do to really make clubhouses as big of a hit as Multiverse was (namely, being able to easily find specific friends whose houses you want to pop into), it’s a promising start to a new era for Poptropica.

Whatever happens, we’ll be here to watch it all go down.

With cautious optimism,

—the PHB 💙

Pop-over

PHB Pop-over Special: The Good Place

Welcome! Everything is fine.

You are, after all, in the Good Place. Okay, so, not exactly. You’re in a PHB “Pop-over,” which is a Poptropica crossover with another universe—in this case, the NBC sitcom known as The Good Place.

Dressing up like any of the main cast of characters — (from left to right, top to bottom) Michael, Jason, Janet, Tahani, Eleanor, and Chidi — is pretty simple, as most of these outfits can be obtained when you create a new character on Poptropica, with a few extra steps for some. Michael’s glasses and suit, plus Tahani’s earrings and Janet’s top, can be found by cranking the switch inside New You on Home Island. Janet’s skirt is from the lady outside the New You building, and Jason has a bit of hair from the backpacker on Home Island.

And you can take a look at any of these styles in the Avatar Studio by typing in the character’s name followed by TGP: MichaelTGP, JasonTGP, JanetTGP, TahaniTGP, EleanorTGP, and ChidiTGP.

The Good Place is a show that finds an assorted group sent to a supposedly utopian afterlife that quickly spirals into more than what anyone bargained for. Along the way, it explores questions of moral philosophy, ethics, and what it means to be a “good” person, all while being entertaining. Rated 13+ on Netflix.

Hope you enjoyed this crossover of The Good Place x Poptropica! Have you watched all four seasons of The Good Place? Looking forward to the finale in January? Share your thoughts in the comments!

~/🐠

Want to see more? Check out our other Pop-overs and browse our Costume database for more Poptropica costumes to inspire your own outfits!